The Best of Both Worlds: 4 Ways Interior Designers Are Bringing Soft and Hard Wood Together

The Best of Both Worlds: 4 Ways Interior Designers Are Bringing Soft and Hard Wood Together

We can all agree that there’s something rather exquisite about wood. In fact, almost every home in the country contains a wood feature of some kind, whether it’s an antique cabinet, a dining room floor, or a quirky kitchen island. Fortunately for homeowners in Stowmarket, the standard of carpentry here is very high. This means that it is relatively easy to commission ‘one off’ bespoke pieces.

You might, for example, invest in carpentry services because you want to build a new staircase or restore an old one. Local carpenters build furniture from scratch and some even work on the foundations of houses, though you’ve got to make sure you hire the right kind of contractor for this. At the moment, interior designers are going crazy for the combination of soft and hard woods, which is something that you could try in your own home.

Keep reading to find out how designers are mixing and matching wood varieties to create striking interior spaces.

Finding the Right Undertone

The first thing to understand is that wood finishes don’t need to match to complement one another. In fact, they can look very different and still work well together. This allows homeowners to pair older antique pieces with much more contemporary furniture. However, the secret to success is making sure that the undertones do match.

Specifically, you want to avoid pairing cold and warm tones. Regardless of finish, both pieces should be either rich and warm or crisp and cool. For example, you could create a striking contract between a dark and mysterious antique coffee table and a lighter, more modern hardwood floor.

Let the Grain Take the Lead

You can successfully mix wood grains, but it works better if the paired pieces are quite subtle. If you’re working with very dramatic and distinct grains, try to keep them similar. This will help to create a cohesive mood within the space. Generally, larger grains are seen as more casual and comfortable.

Tighter grains tend to generate a more formal aesthetic. This is something to think about if you’re planning to use carpentry services in Stowmarket to create signature pieces. The combination of light wood floors and dark furniture is a very popular choice, especially when the grain is kept very open and rustic.

Add a Buffer for Style Points

You may find yourself with contrasting wood pieces which are quite hard to fit together. They might have distinct grains, very different undertones, or just somehow don’t sit comfortably alongside one another. Nevertheless, it might still be important for them to coexist within the same interior space.

This usually happens, for instance, when an antique piece is highly valued but it doesn’t necessarily fit well with other wood varieties. One way to create a more seamless aesthetic is to simply add a visual buffer. Something as inexpensive as an area rug can break up the room and prevent two jarringly different wood varieties from meeting directly.

When In Doubt, White It Out

Alternatively, you can add a little white. It is one of those ‘cure all’ shades which brings disparate designs and materials together. It is a tempering colour and it also adds calm and visual balance. White is particularly great in family kitchens, where it is often used to create a very clean, contemporary aesthetic but without the coldness of more minimalist designs.

White wood cabinets are hugely popular with homeowners in Stowmarket. They are easy to clean, very durable, and match pretty much any kind of décor. White can be ultra-chic, warm and cosy, continentally inspired, or evocative of exotic Eastern designs. It is also great for moderating the use of bright, bold colours.

If you’re interested in commissioning unique ‘one off’ wood features, click here to visit Ligna Carpentry today. Or, call 01449 770 005 to speak to an advisor and get a cost estimate for your next carpentry project.

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